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Southern Alps (disambiguation)

The Southern Alps are a mountain range in New Zealand’s South Island.
Southern Alps may also refer to:

Southern Alps (Europe), a geographically and geologically defined region of the Alps in Europe
Southern Limestone Alps, a geological subdivision of the European Alps
Colloquially, the southern parts of the Alps in general
The Akaishi Mountains, or Southern Alps, in Japan

This disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Southern Alps.
If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the intended article.

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Billy Bishop Airport

Billy Bishop Airport may refer to:

Owen Sound Billy Bishop Regional Airport
Billy Bishop Toronto City Airport (Toronto island airport)

This disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Billy Bishop Airport.
If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the intended article.

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Breinigerberg

Breinigerberg

Village of Stolberg

Breinigerberg

Coordinates: 50°44′N 6°14′E / 50.733°N 6.233°E / 50.733; 6.233Coordinates: 50°44′N 6°14′E / 50.733°N 6.233°E / 50.733; 6.233

Country
Germany

State
North Rhine-Westphalia

Admin. region
Köln

District
Aachen

Town
Stolberg

Population (2005-12-31)

 • Total
971

Time zone
CET/CEST (UTC+1/+2)

Postal codes
52223

Dialling codes
02402

Vehicle registration
AC

Breinigerberg is one of 17 districts and villages belonging to the town of Stolberg (Rhineland), which is one of the major towns in the borough of Aachen. According to a census dated 31 December 2005, the village had 971 inhabitants.
Overview[edit]
The L12 country road passes through the centre of Breinigerberg and links it to Breinig to the west and the crossing of Nachtigaellchen to the east, which in turn is west of Mausbach.
To the east of Breinigerberg is the forest of Stolberg (part of the North Eifel Nature Park) and the Schlangenberg Nature Reserve which is famous for its calamine flora. The hill of Schlangenberg is 276 metres above sea level and originates in the former ore mine of Breinigerberg. Names like Bleiweg, which means “Way of lead”, even today, give hints to the history of the village. The calamine from the ore mine Breinigerberg was used exclusively in Stolberg for the production of brass.
The history of Breinigerberg can be traced back to the Romans. Twenty five coins dated between 100 BC and the year 92/93 AD as well as remains of a Roman craftsmen settlement had been found in the village. The buildings show that the ancient Romans worked between 100 and 400 AD in this Breinigerberg region.
In the former primary school which was closed in 1988 an information centre on the Schlangenberg nature reserve has been opened by the Eifel- und Heimatverein Breinig. It is open to the public and presents detailed information on the special flora and fauna of the Schlangenberg region. Historical tools used in the ore mines of Breinigerberg are exhibited as well.
To the north and south of Breinigerberg there are further nature reserves like the Brockenberg or Baerenstein. Most of them are former chalk pits.
Breinigerberg has two sports grounds used by the local football team FC. Breinigerberg. The former primary school is also used as a youth centre (Remember).
One of the major events at Breinigerberg is the funfair one week after Pentecost.
Literature[edit]

Infor
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Agatston score

In diagnostic cardiology, the Agatston score, named after its developer Arthur Agatston, is a measure of calcium generally included in the results from a CT Test for Coronary Calcification.[1]
The Agatston score is derived from the work of Drs. Agatston and Janowitz of the University of Miami School of Medicine and dates back into the 1980s. The original work was based on electron beam computed tomography (also known as ultrafast CT or EBCT). The score is calculated using a weighted value assigned to the highest density of calcification in a given coronary artery. The density is measured in Hounsfield units, and score of 1 for 130–199 HU, 2 for 200–299 HU, 3 for 300–399 HU, and 4 for 400 HU and greater. This weighted score is then multiplied by the area (in square millimeters) of the coronary calcification. For example, a “speck” of coronary calcification in the left anterior descending artery measures 4 square millimeters and has a peak density of 270 HU. The score is therefore 8 (4 square millimeters × weighted score of 2). The tomographic slices of the heart are 3 millimeters thick and average about 50–60 slices from the coronary artery ostia to the inferior wall of the heart. The calcium score of every calcification in each coronary artery for all of the tomographic slices is then summed up to give the total coronary artery calcium score (CAC score).
Recent refinement of calcium scoring has been introduced to harness further information related to coronary plaque. This lesion-specific calcium-scoring method has been shown to be superior to the Agatston Score.[2]
References[edit]

^ Hoffmann U, Brady TJ, Muller J (August 2003). “Cardiology patient page. Use of new imaging techniques to screen for coronary artery disease”. Circulation. 108 (8): e50–3. doi:10.1161/01.CIR.0000085363.88377.F2. PMID 12939244. 
^ Qian Z, Anderson H, Marvasty I, et al. (2010). “Lesion- and vessel-specific coronary artery calcium scores are superior to whole-heart Agatston and volume scores in the diagnosis of obstructive coronary artery disease”. J Cardiovasc Comput Tomogr. 4 (6): 391–9. doi:10.1016/j.jcct.2010.09.001. PMID 21035423. 

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Canterbury corpus

The Canterbury corpus is a collection of files intended for use as a benchmark for testing lossless data compression algorithms. It was created in 1997 at the University of Canterbury, New Zealand and designed to replace the Calgary corpus. The files were selected based on their ability to provide representative performance results.[1]

Contents

1 Contents
2 See also
3 References
4 External links

Contents[edit]
In its most commonly used form, the corpus consists of 11 files, selected as “average” documents from 11 classes of documents,[2] totaling 2,810,784 bytes as follows.

Size (bytes)
File name
Description

152,089
alice29.txt
English text

125,179
asyoulik.txt
Shakespeare

24,603
cp.html
HTML source

11,150
fields.c
C source

3,721
grammar.lsp
LISP source

1,029,744
kennedy.xls
Excel spreadsheet

426,754
lcet10.txt
Technical writing

481,861
pl‌rabn12.txt
Poetry

513,216
ptt5
CCITT test set

38,240
sum
SPARC executable

4,227
xargs.1
GNU manual page

See also[edit]

Data compression

References[edit]

^ Ian H. Witten; Alistair Moffat; Timothy C. Bell (1999). Managing Gigabytes: Compressing and Indexing Documents and Images. Morgan Kaufmann. p. 92. 
^ Salomon, David (2007). Data Compression: The Complete Reference (Fourth ed.). Springer. p. 12. ISBN 9781846286032. 

External links[edit]

The Canterbury Corpus

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Standard test items

Pangram
Reference implementation
Standard test image

Television (testcard)

SMPTE color bars
Indian-head test pattern
Test Card F
Philips PM5544

Computer languages

“Hello, World!” program
Quine
Trabb Pardo–Knuth algorithm
Man or boy test
Just another Perl hacker

Data compression

Calgary corpus
Canterbury corpus

3D computer graphics

Cornell box
Stanford bunny
Stanford dragon
Utah teapot

Typography

Lorem ipsum
The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog

Other

EICAR test file
GTUBE
Harvard sentences
Lenna
“Tom’s Diner”
SMPTE universal leader

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Data compression methods

Lossless

Entropy type

Unary
Arithmetic
Asymmetric Numeral Systems
Golomb
Huffman

Adaptive
Canonical
Modified

Range
Shannon
Shannon–Fano
Shannon–Fano–Elias
Tunstall
Universal

Exp-Golomb
Fibonacci
Gamma
Levenshtein

Dictionary type

Byte pair encoding
DEFLATE
Snappy
Lempel–Ziv

LZ77 / LZ78 (LZ1 / LZ2)
LZJB
LZMA
LZO
LZRW
LZS
LZSS
LZW
LZWL
LZX
LZ4
Brotli
Statistical

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Sapins FC

Sapins FC

Full name
Sapins Football Club

Founded
2010

Ground
Stade Augustin Monédan de Sibang
Libreville, Gabon

Ground Capacity
7,000

Manager
Obame Bekouré

League
Gabon Championnat National D1

2013–14
5th

Sapins Football Club is a Gabonese football club based in Libreville, Gabon. The club playing in the highest level league of Gabon – Gabon Championnat National D1.
Current squad[edit]
As of 18 January 2015[1]
Note: Flags indicate national team as defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality.

No.

Position
Player

1

GK
Eric Kwekeu

2

MF
Yann Mangonda

3

DF
Kwami Eninful

5

DF
Seck Mouanganga

6

DF
Soumaila Biyogo

7

FW
Dimitri Nzué

9

FW
Primael Maissa

10

MF
Vincent Orode Tchalla

11

FW
Junior Mwachukwu

12

DF
Thadée Evoungvoung

13

MF
Alphonse Ndong

14

MF
Hassane Priso

15

MF
Davy Guimambout

16

GK
Georges Afane

17

FW
Thierry Malcolm

18

MF
Fabrice Ondo

No.

Position
Player

19

FW
Hans Biveghe

20

DF
Maxime Hounton

21

DF
Jean Nzé Mba

22

GK
Mamadou Diop

24

DF
Mor Soumaré

25

MF
Françis Ndjeme

26

DF
Warren Moungoungou

27

MF
Mathieu Akame Ekang

28

DF
Jovanie Mezui

29

MF
Guy Reteno Elekana

30

GK
Cheick Ndiaye

31

FW
Naby Kamano

32

MF
Teddy Linganzu

33

MF
Latyr Touré

34

FW
Bercmance Mbina

35

FW
Arthur Weberdibongo Touré

References[edit]

^ FC Sapins – Effectif

External links[edit]

Profile

This article about a Gabonese football club is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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Hay Stack Corner, Wisconsin

Hay Stack Corner, Wisconsin

Unincorporated community

Hay Stack Corner, Wisconsin

Show map of Wisconsin

Hay Stack Corner, Wisconsin

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Coordinates: 45°38′55″N 90°52′33″W / 45.64861°N 90.87583°W / 45.64861; -90.87583Coordinates: 45°38′55″N 90°52′33″W / 45.64861°N 90.87583°W / 45.64861; -90.87583

Country
United States

State
Wisconsin

County
Sawyer

Elevation
1,401 ft (427 m)

Time zone
Central (CST) (UTC-6)

 • Summer (DST)
CDT (UTC-5)

Area code(s)
715 & 534

GNIS feature ID
1577633[1]

Hay Stack Corner is an unincorporated community in the town of Winter, Sawyer County, Wisconsin, United States. Hay Stack Corner is 13.5 miles (21.7 km) south-southeast of the village of Winter.
References[edit]

^ “Hay Stack Corner”. Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. 

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Municipalities and communities of Sawyer County, Wisconsin, United States

County seat: Hayward

City

Hayward

Villages

Couderay
Exeland
Radisson
Winter

Towns

Bass Lake
Couderay
Draper
Edgewater
Hayward
Hunter
Lenroot
Meadowbrook
Meteor
Ojibwa
Radisson
Round Lake
Sand Lake
Spider Lake
Weirgor
Winter

CDPs

Chief Lake
Little Round Lake
New Post
Reserve
Stone Lake‡

Unincorporated
communities

Draper
Edgewater
Hauer
Hay Stack Corner
Lemington
Loretta
Meteor
Northwoods Beach
Ojibwa
Oxbo
Phipps
Seeley
Weirgor
Wooddale
Yarnell

Indian
reservation

Lac Courte Oreilles‡

Footnotes

‡This populated place also has portions in an adjacent county or counties

This article about a location in Sawyer County, Wisconsin is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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Léon Lévy Brunswick

Léon-Lévy Brunswick

Born
20 April 1805
Paris

Died
29 July 1859(1859-07-29) (aged 54)
Le Havre

Occupation
Librettiste, journalist, writer, dramatist

Léon Lévy Brunswick (20 April 1805, in Paris – 29 July 1859, in Le Havre) was a French playwright. He started as a journalist before turning to theater. He is the author of many comedies with Jean-François Bayard, Louis-Émile Vanderburch, and Arthur de Beauplan such as Boccaccio, or the Prince of Palmero by Franz von Suppé.[1] But it is with Adolphe de Leuven that he is known for his greatest successes, notably booklets of comic operas by Adolphe Adam (Le Brasseur de Preston, Le Postillon de Lonjumeau, Le Roi d’Yvetot).[2] He has also published under the pseudonym of Leo Lhérie.[3]
Selected works[edit]

With Adolphe de Leuven: Le mariage au tambour. Comédie en trois actes, mêlée de chant. (Théâtre français en prose. Series 4, 8.) Velhagen & Klasing, Bielefeld 1855, OCLC 758710646.
With Adolphe de Leuven, Adolphe Adam, Carl Friedrich Wittmann: Der Postillon von Lonjumeau. Komische Oper in drei Aufzügen. (Reclams Universal-Bibliothek, 2749.; Opernbücher in Reclams Universal-Bibliothek, 12.; Reclams Universal-Bibliothek/Opernbücher, 12.) Reclam, Leipzig um 1920, OCLC 174800475.

References[edit]

^ Berliner Gramophone. “The Gramophone five inch Berliner records online catalogue”. Berliner Gramophone de 12,5 cm. Retrieved 19 August 2013. 
^ Operas, Arias, Composers. “Le Postillon Lonjumeau”. Bizreach.jp. Retrieved 19 August 2013.  CS1 maint: Multiple names: authors list (link)
^ Poinsot, Edmond Antoine. “Dictionnaire des pseudonymes”. Internet Archive.org. Retrieved 19 August 2013. 

External links[edit]

Works by or about Léon Lévy Brunswick at Internet Archive

Authority control

WorldCat Identities
VIAF: 64136999
LCCN: n82237491
GND: 121683559
SUDOC: 032669771
BNF: cb129667834 (data)
BNE: XX1107536

This article about a French writer or poet is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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LIM domain-binding protein family

LIM-domain binding protein

Identifiers

Symbol
LIM_bind

Pfam
PF01803

InterPro
IPR002691

SCOP
1j2o

SUPERFAMILY
1j2o

Available protein structures:

Pfam
structures

PDB
RCSB PDB; PDBe; PDBj

PDBsum
structure summary

In molecular biology, the LIM domain-binding protein family is a family of proteins which binds to the LIM domain of LIM homeodomain proteins which are transcriptional regulators of development.
Examples[edit]
Nuclear LIM interactor (NLI) / LIM domain-binding protein 1 (LDB1) is located in the nuclei of neuronal cells during development, it is co-expressed with ISL1 in early motor neuron differentiation and has a suggested role in the ISL1 dependent development of motor neurons.[1] It is suggested that these proteins act synergistically to enhance transcriptional efficiency by acting as co-factors for LIM homeodomain and Otx class transcription factors both of which have essential roles in development.[2] The Drosophila melanogaster protein Chip is required for segmentation and activity of a remote wing margin enhancer.[3] Chip is a ubiquitous chromosomal factor required for normal expression of diverse genes at many stages of development.[3] It is suggested that Chip cooperates with different LIM domain proteins and other factors to structurally support remote enhancer-promoter interactions.[3]
References[edit]

^ Jurata LW, Kenny DA, Gill GN (October 1996). “Nuclear LIM interactor, a rhombotin and LIM homeodomain interacting protein, is expressed early in neuronal development”. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 93 (21): 11693–8. doi:10.1073/pnas.93.21.11693. PMC 38120. PMID 8876198. 
^ Bach I, Carriere C, Ostendorff HP, Andersen B, Rosenfeld MG (June 1997). “A family of LIM domain-associated cofactors confer transcriptional synergism between LIM and Otx homeodomain proteins”. Genes Dev. 11 (11): 1370–80. doi:10.1101/gad.11.11.1370. PMID 9192866. 
^ a b c Morcillo P, Rosen C, Baylies MK, Dorsett D (October 1997). “Chip, a widely expressed chromosomal protein required for segmentation and activity of a remote wing margin enhancer in Drosophila”. Genes Dev. 11 (20): 2729–40. doi:10.1101/gad.11.20.2729. PMC 316608. PMID 9334334. 

This article incorporates text from the public domain Pfam and InterPro IPR002691

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2015–16 Illinois State Redbirds women’s basketball team

2015–16 Illinois State Redbirds women’s basketball

Conference
Missouri Valley Conference

2015–16 record
8–22 (6–12 The Valley)

Head coach
Barb Smith (3rd year)

Assistant coach
Lisa Hayden

Assistant coach
Cathy Boswell

Assistant coach
Jessica Grayson

Home arena
Redbird Arena

Seasons

« 2014–15
2016–17 »

2015–16 Missouri Valley Conference women’s basketball standings

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Conf
 
 
Overall

Team
W
 
L
 
PCT
 
 
W
 
L
 
PCT

Northern Iowa
15

3
 
.833
 
 
24

11
 
.686

Missouri State †
14

4
 
.778
 
 
24

10
 
.706

Drake
14

4
 
.778
 
 
23

10
 
.697

Southern Illinois
12

6
 
.667
 
 
20

13
 
.606

Loyola-Chicago
10

8
 
.556
 
 
14

16
 
.467

Indiana State
9

9
 
.500
 
 
13

17
 
.433

Illinois State
6

12
 
.333
 
 
8

22
 
.267

Wichita State
5

13
 
.278
 
 
8

22
 
.267

Bradley
4

14
 
.222
 
 
9

22
 
.290

Evansville
1

17
 
.056
 
 
3

28
 
.097

† 2016 MVC Tournament winner
As of March 24, 2016; Rankings from AP Poll

The 2015–16 Illinois State Redbirds women’s basketball team represents Illinois State University during the 2015–16 NCAA Division I women’s basketball season. The Redbirds, led by third year head coach Barb Smith, play their home games at Redbird Arena and are members of the Missouri Valley Conference. They finished the season 8–22, 6–12 in MVC play to finish in seventh place. They lost in the first round of the Missouri Valley Women’s Tournament to Evansville.

Contents

1 Roster
2 Schedule
3 See also
4 References

Roster[edit]

2015–16 Illinois State Redbirds women’s basketball team

Players
Coaches

Pos.
#
Name
Height
Year
Previous school
Home town

3.5 !F
1
Smith, ColleeneColleene Smith
72 !6 ft 0 in (1.83 m)
4.0 !Sr
Cape Coral
ASA College
New Haven, CT

3.5 !F
3
Crump, OctaviaOctavia Crump
70 !5 ft 10 in (1.78 m)
4.0 !Sr
Zion-Benton
Zion, IL

1.5 !G
5
Beachum, BrechelleBrechelle Beachum
67 !5 ft 7 in (1.7 m)
3.0 !Jr
Western Texas College
Mexia, TX

1.5 !G
11
Radtke, MorganMorgan Radtke
70 !5 ft 10 in (1.78 m)
2.0 !So
Palatine
Palatine, IL

3.5 !F
12
Stevens, MillieMillie Stevens
72 !6
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