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Breinigerberg

Breinigerberg

Village of Stolberg

Breinigerberg

Coordinates: 50°44′N 6°14′E / 50.733°N 6.233°E / 50.733; 6.233Coordinates: 50°44′N 6°14′E / 50.733°N 6.233°E / 50.733; 6.233

Country
Germany

State
North Rhine-Westphalia

Admin. region
Köln

District
Aachen

Town
Stolberg

Population (2005-12-31)

 • Total
971

Time zone
CET/CEST (UTC+1/+2)

Postal codes
52223

Dialling codes
02402

Vehicle registration
AC

Breinigerberg is one of 17 districts and villages belonging to the town of Stolberg (Rhineland), which is one of the major towns in the borough of Aachen. According to a census dated 31 December 2005, the village had 971 inhabitants.
Overview[edit]
The L12 country road passes through the centre of Breinigerberg and links it to Breinig to the west and the crossing of Nachtigaellchen to the east, which in turn is west of Mausbach.
To the east of Breinigerberg is the forest of Stolberg (part of the North Eifel Nature Park) and the Schlangenberg Nature Reserve which is famous for its calamine flora. The hill of Schlangenberg is 276 metres above sea level and originates in the former ore mine of Breinigerberg. Names like Bleiweg, which means “Way of lead”, even today, give hints to the history of the village. The calamine from the ore mine Breinigerberg was used exclusively in Stolberg for the production of brass.
The history of Breinigerberg can be traced back to the Romans. Twenty five coins dated between 100 BC and the year 92/93 AD as well as remains of a Roman craftsmen settlement had been found in the village. The buildings show that the ancient Romans worked between 100 and 400 AD in this Breinigerberg region.
In the former primary school which was closed in 1988 an information centre on the Schlangenberg nature reserve has been opened by the Eifel- und Heimatverein Breinig. It is open to the public and presents detailed information on the special flora and fauna of the Schlangenberg region. Historical tools used in the ore mines of Breinigerberg are exhibited as well.
To the north and south of Breinigerberg there are further nature reserves like the Brockenberg or Baerenstein. Most of them are former chalk pits.
Breinigerberg has two sports grounds used by the local football team FC. Breinigerberg. The former primary school is also used as a youth centre (Remember).
One of the major events at Breinigerberg is the funfair one week after Pentecost.
Literature[edit]

Infor
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Eugene Lyons

Eugene Lyons in 1940.

Eugene Lyons (July 1, 1898 – January 7, 1985) was an American journalist and writer. A fellow traveler of Communism in his younger years, Lyons became highly critical of the Soviet Union after several years there as a correspondent of United Press International. Lyons also wrote a biography of President Herbert Hoover.

Contents

1 Biography

1.1 Early years
1.2 Moscow years
1.3 Return to America
1.4 Death and legacy

2 Works
3 Footnotes
4 External links

Biography[edit]
Early years[edit]
Eugene Lyons was born July 1, 1898, to a Jewish family in the town of Uzlyany, now part of Belarus but then part of the Russian empire. His parents were Nathan Lyons and Minnie Privin. His parents emigrated to the U.S., and he grew up among the teeming tenements of the Lower East Side of New York City.
“I thought myself a ‘socialist’ almost as soon as I thought at all,” Lyons recalled in his memoirs. As a youth he attended a Socialist Sunday School on East Broadway, where he sang socialist hymns such as “The Internationale” and “The Red Flag.” He later enrolled as a member of the Young People’s Socialist League, the youth section of the Socialist Party of America (SPA).
In 1916, Lyons enrolled in the College of the City of New York before transferring to Columbia University the next year. During his school years he worked as an assistant to an English teacher in an adult education course.[1]
During World War I, Lyons was enlisted in the Students Army Training Corps, an adjunct of the United States Army. With the end of the war in November 1918, Lyons was demobilized and honorably discharged.[2] He later recalled that on the day he removed his uniform, he wrote his very first story, a piece for Elizabeth Gurley Flynn and the Workers Defense Union, which she organized on behalf of the Industrial Workers of the World.[3] Lyons worked for the Workers Defense Union for some time, composing news releases for the Socialist daily newspaper New York Call and other left wing publications. “It was a time of raids on radicals, ‘Treat-’em-rough!’ hooliganism, and mass deportations,” Lyons later recalled.[4]
Lyons then went to work as a reporter for the Erie, Pennsylvania Dispatch-Herald.[5] He also worked briefly for the New York paper Financial America and at writing copy in the publicity departments of two motion picture companies.[6]
In the fall of 1920, with revolution in the wind in Italy and dreaming of becoming the next John Reed, Lyons mad
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Kathleen Hays

This biography of a living person needs additional citations for verification. Please help by adding reliable sources. Contentious material about living persons that is unsourced or poorly sourced must be removed immediately, especially if potentially libelous or harmful. (February 2013) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)

Kathleen Hays

Alma mater
Stanford University

Occupation
journalist, economist

Known for
presenter on Bloomberg media

Kathleen Hays is a university-trained economist with experience at the Federal Reserve and who is now an on-air financial reporter for Bloomberg Television. She was formerly a reporter for Investor’s Business Daily, CNBC’s Squawk Box and various CNNfn programming before joining Bloomberg.
Education[edit]
She is fluent in English and Spanish. She holds both a bachelor’s degree and a master’s degree in Economics from Stanford University.[1]
References[edit]

^ Bloomberg Kathleen Hays Bio. Retrieved 2010-11-22.

This biographical article related to television is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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Šemnik

Šemnik

Šemnik

Location in Slovenia

Coordinates: 46°8′35.27″N 14°56′1.88″E / 46.1431306°N 14.9338556°E / 46.1431306; 14.9338556Coordinates: 46°8′35.27″N 14°56′1.88″E / 46.1431306°N 14.9338556°E / 46.1431306; 14.9338556

Country
Slovenia

Traditional region
Upper Carniola

Statistical region
Central Sava

Municipality
Zagorje ob Savi

Area

 • Total
4.46 km2 (1.72 sq mi)

Elevation
409.3 m (1,342.8 ft)

Population (2002)

 • Total
359

[1]

Šemnik (pronounced [ʃɛˈmniːk]; German: Schemnik[2]) is a settlement south of Izlake in the Municipality of Zagorje ob Savi in central Slovenia. The area is part of the traditional region of Upper Carniola. It is now included with the rest of the municipality in the Central Sava Statistical Region.[3]
The local church is dedicated to Saint Anne and belongs to the Parish of Izlake. It is a Gothic building that was restyled in the Baroque in the mid-18th century.[4]
References[edit]

^ Statistical Office of the Republic of Slovenia
^ Leksikon občin kraljestev in dežel zastopanih v državnem zboru, vol. 6: Kranjsko. 1906. Vienna: C. Kr. Dvorna in Državna Tiskarna, p. 94.
^ Zagorje ob Savi municipal site
^ Slovenian Ministry of Culture register of national heritage reference number ešd 1861

External links[edit]

Media related to Šemnik at Wikimedia Commons
Šemnik on Geopedia

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Municipality of Zagorje ob Savi

Settlements

Administrative centre: Zagorje ob Savi

Current

Blodnik
Borje
Borje pri Mlinšah
Borovak pri Podkumu
Brezje
Breznik
Briše
Čemšenik
Čolnišče
Dobrljevo
Dolenja Vas
Dolgo Brdo pri Mlinšah
Družina
Golče
Gorenja Vas
Hrastnik pri Trojanah
Izlake
Jablana
Jarše
Jelenk
Jelševica
Jesenovo
Kal
Kandrše
Kisovec
Kolk
Kolovrat
Konjšica
Kostrevnica
Kotredež
Log pri Mlinšah
Loke pri Zagorju
Mali Kum
Medija
Mlinše
Mošenik
Orehovica
Osredek
Padež
Podkraj pri Zagorju
Podkum
Podlipovica
Polšina
Potoška Vas
Požarje
Prapreče
Ravenska Vas
Ravne pri Mlinšah
Razbor pri Čemšeniku
Razpotje
Rodež
Rove
Rovišče
Rtiče
Ržiše
Selo pri Zagorju
Šemnik
Senožeti
Šentgotard
Šentlambert
Šklendrovec
Sopota
Špital
Spodnji Šemnik
Strahovlje
Tirna
Vidrga
Vine
Vrh pri Mlinšah
Vrh
Vrhe
Zabava
Zabreznik
Zavine
Zgornji Prhovec
Znojile
Žvarulje

Former

Kal
Klenovnik
Kobiljek
Krhulje
Krivica
Lipovica
Prečna
Renke
Ribnik
Selce
Selišče
Sveta
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Climate of Uranus

Uranus’s southern hemisphere in approximate natural colour (left) and in higher wavelengths (right), showing its faint cloud bands and atmospheric “hood” as seen by Voyager 2

The climate of Uranus is heavily influenced by both its lack of internal heat, which limits atmospheric activity, and by its extreme axial tilt, which induces intense seasonal variation. Uranus’s atmosphere is remarkably bland in comparison to the other gas giants which it otherwise closely resembles.[1][2] When Voyager 2 flew by Uranus in 1986, it observed a total of ten cloud features across the entire planet.[3][4] Later observations from the ground or by the Hubble Space Telescope made in the 1990s and the 2000s revealed bright clouds in the northern (winter) hemisphere. In 2006 a dark spot similar to the Great Dark Spot on Neptune was detected.[5]

Contents

1 Banded structure, winds and clouds

1.1 Uranus Dark Spot
1.2 Winds

2 Seasonal variation
3 Circulation models
4 References
5 External links

Banded structure, winds and clouds[edit]

Uranus in 2005. Rings, southern collar and a light cloud in the northern hemisphere are visible.

In 1986 Voyager 2 discovered that the visible southern hemisphere of Uranus can be subdivided into two regions: a bright polar cap and dark equatorial bands (see figure on the right).[6] Their boundary is located at about −45 degrees of latitude. A narrow band straddling the latitudinal range from −45 to −50 degrees is the brightest large feature on Uranus’s visible surface.[6][7] It is called a southern “collar”. The cap and collar are thought to be a dense region of methane clouds located within the pressure range of 1.3 to 2 bar.[8] Unfortunately Voyager 2 arrived during the height of Uranus’s southern summer and could not observe the northern hemisphere. However, at the end of 1990s and the beginning of the twenty-first century, when the northern polar region came into view, Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and Keck telescope initially observed neither a collar nor a polar cap in the northern hemisphere.[7] So Uranus appeared to be asymmetric: bright near the south pole and uniformly dark in the region north of the southern collar.[7] In 2007, however, when Uranus passed its equinox, the southern collar almost disappeared, whereas a faint northern collar emerged near 45 degrees of latitude.[9] The visible latitudinal structure of Uranus is different from that of Jupiter and Saturn, which demonstrate multiple narrow and co
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Agatston score

In diagnostic cardiology, the Agatston score, named after its developer Arthur Agatston, is a measure of calcium generally included in the results from a CT Test for Coronary Calcification.[1]
The Agatston score is derived from the work of Drs. Agatston and Janowitz of the University of Miami School of Medicine and dates back into the 1980s. The original work was based on electron beam computed tomography (also known as ultrafast CT or EBCT). The score is calculated using a weighted value assigned to the highest density of calcification in a given coronary artery. The density is measured in Hounsfield units, and score of 1 for 130–199 HU, 2 for 200–299 HU, 3 for 300–399 HU, and 4 for 400 HU and greater. This weighted score is then multiplied by the area (in square millimeters) of the coronary calcification. For example, a “speck” of coronary calcification in the left anterior descending artery measures 4 square millimeters and has a peak density of 270 HU. The score is therefore 8 (4 square millimeters × weighted score of 2). The tomographic slices of the heart are 3 millimeters thick and average about 50–60 slices from the coronary artery ostia to the inferior wall of the heart. The calcium score of every calcification in each coronary artery for all of the tomographic slices is then summed up to give the total coronary artery calcium score (CAC score).
Recent refinement of calcium scoring has been introduced to harness further information related to coronary plaque. This lesion-specific calcium-scoring method has been shown to be superior to the Agatston Score.[2]
References[edit]

^ Hoffmann U, Brady TJ, Muller J (August 2003). “Cardiology patient page. Use of new imaging techniques to screen for coronary artery disease”. Circulation. 108 (8): e50–3. doi:10.1161/01.CIR.0000085363.88377.F2. PMID 12939244. 
^ Qian Z, Anderson H, Marvasty I, et al. (2010). “Lesion- and vessel-specific coronary artery calcium scores are superior to whole-heart Agatston and volume scores in the diagnosis of obstructive coronary artery disease”. J Cardiovasc Comput Tomogr. 4 (6): 391–9. doi:10.1016/j.jcct.2010.09.001. PMID 21035423. 

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